Dog Bleeding

The causes and treatments of a dog’s bleeding.

SUPERFICIAL CUT WITH MINOR BLEEDING (blood oozes from a dog’s wound; bleeding stops easily with minimal pressure to wound)

Causes: Trauma (stepping on, falling on, or bumping into a sharp object such as glass, metal, or barbed wire).

What to do: Gently clean the dog’s wound with saline solution (available at your pharmacy) or plain water. Using a gauze pad or soft clean cloth, apply pressure until bleeding stops. If necessary, hold the pad in place with tape or a stretchy non-stick bandage.

DEEP CUT WITH MAJOR BLEEDING (bright red blood spurting from a dog’s wound or darker-colored blood flowing profusely from it; bleeding is difficult to stop).

Causes: Trauma (stepping on, falling on, or bumping into a sharp object such as glass, metal, or barbed wire; being hit by a car; jumping through a window; gunshot wounds).

What to do: Keep the dog calm and quiet. Apply pressure to the dog’s wound with a gauze pad or soft, clean cloth. Replace the pad if it becomes saturated, but try to maintain pressure on the wound. If necessary, hold the pad or cloth in place with tape, but do not attempt to apply a tourniquet. Do not release pressure for at least five minutes. If bleeding hasn’t stopped, reapply pressure. Take the dog to a veterinarian for further treatment.

BLEEDING FROM EARS

Causes: Trauma to head or ears, or ear infection.

What to do: Keep the dog calm and quiet if you suspect head trauma. Take the dog to a veterinarian to diagnose and treat.

BLEEDING FROM MOUTH

Causes: Trauma to teeth or mouth, gum disease (periodontal disease, ulcerative gingivitis, gingival hyperplasia), foreign body in tongue or cheek, oral tumors, toxicity (anticoagulant rodenticides), coagulation disorders (congenital and disease-related), or vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels, caused by Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other diseases).

What to do: Keep the dog calm and quiet. Avoid muzzling. Take the dog to a veterinarian to diagnose and treat.

BLEEDING FROM NOSE

Causes: Trauma, tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuse, foreign body, inflammation of the nasal passages (fungal infections, local irritation), atopy (allergy to inhaled substances), toxicity (anticoagulant rodenticides), coagulation disorders (congenital and disease-related), or vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels, caused by Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other diseases).

What to do: Keep dog calm and quiet. Avoid muzzling. Take dog to veterinarian for diagnosis and treatment.

BLEEDING FROM ANUS (see also Tarry or Bloody Stool)

Cause: Trauma (such as a fight wound).

What to do: If possible, clean the dog’s wound with saline solution (available at your pharmacy) or plain water. Take the dog to a veterinarian for further treatment.

BLEEDING FROM VULVA

Causes: Pyometra (uterine infection), trauma, or estrus.

What to do: Nothing, if due to estrus. For other causes, take the dog to a veterinarian to diagnose and treat.

BLEEDING FROM TOENAIL

Cause: Snagging toenail on carpet or rough surface.

What to do: If the toenail is broken at its base within the fleshy part of the toe or you are apprehensive about performing the following procedures, take the dog to a veterinarian for treatment. If the break is farther from the flesh of the toe, cut off the broken toenail with standard nail clippers. The toenail stump will probably bleed profusely: apply hemostatic powder, cornstarch, or flour to stop it. Place a gauze pad or cotton over the toenail and wrap the dog’s paw securely. Leave the wrap in place for eight to 12 hours. If the nail is still bleeding, rewrap and take the dog to a veterinarian for further treatment. (Note: Broken toenails are often very painful. Proper restraint, which may require muzzling, is essential to avoid being bitten.)

BLEEDING IN OR AROUND THE EYE

Causes: Trauma.

What to do: Keep the dog calm to prevent further trauma to the eye. Take the dog to a veterinarian to diagnose and treat.

- Instructions for transporting an injured dog -

Disclaimer: DogChannel.com’s Dog Medical Conditions are intended for educational purposes only. They are not meant to replace the expertise and experience of a professional veterinarian. Do not use the information presented here to make decisions about your dog’s ailment. If you notice changes in your dog’s health or behavior, please take your pet to the nearest veterinarian or an emergency pet clinic as soon as possible.

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Eileen - 249708   Port Perry, ON

1/6/2013 4:46:26 AM

Good information for a dog owner to know.

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Ernie   Mission Viejo, California

10/26/2012 8:27:09 AM

Janet, there are a number of free veterinary services in the Houston area that might be able to help or refer you to someone who can help. Try calling SNAP, 713-522-2337 or the Houston Humane Society, 713-433-6421. DogChannel editor.

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Janet   Houston, Texas

10/25/2012 8:27:49 AM

Iam 81 and have ZERO money to go vet. What alternative can I give my bleeding Westie?

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Janet   Houston, Texas

10/25/2012 8:24:50 AM

My Westie is bleeding from his mouth due to "rotten" mouth from bad teeth.

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