Comments on Dog Clubs Weigh In on the Obama Dog Choices

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lynette   olympia, WA

4/11/2009 11:05:37 AM

i have a labradoodle and he is a low shedder and very smart.its my opinion that mixed breeds make better healthier dogs without the health problems of overbred dogs my nex dog will be a mixed breed,...probably a rescue which you could say the same things about.

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Linda   Kalamazoo, MI

2/9/2009 9:14:09 PM

Having researched extensively before purchasing our family dog, I would hope the First Family to choose the Australian Labradoodle. The Australian Labradoodle is only a couple of steps away from becoming a recognized breed. We bought ours from a reputable kennel. She has a family tree to be admired and her ancesters are all wonderful Labradoodles...The breed is standardized if purchased from a reputable Australian Labradoodle kennel. Labradoodles have an incredible intuitive nature. The dog's coat will be shedfree, can be curly wool or wavy, spiral fleece; it's disposition will be laid back but friendly, some lines favoring the calmness of the therapy dog, and the forever family will be assured of a wonderful new canine family member...I would hope a multi-generation Labradoodle would be the First Family's choice.

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Peggy   Orange, VA

2/7/2009 12:06:14 PM

hey- lay of the mixed breed choice! I have a first generation labradoodle...she is sweet,smart,funny,and BEAUTIFUL. I just love
her.
...and I have pictures!!!!! good choice.I am partial to the blondes.

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Linny   Sydney, PA

2/1/2009 5:39:15 AM

This so called "Press Release" is propaganda, and nothing more than an attempt by the Poodle Club of America to increase sales by their members.


There are many visually impaired and other people with disabilities around the world who would not have the quality of life that they enjoy today without their Labradoodle Guide and Assistance Dogs, and the hard work and dedication of the people involved with the Guide Dogs Associations who train them. It is very disappointing to see an organisation such as the PCA attempting to deny their existence in order to advance its own
agenda.

The blatant misinformation on their website and in this press release does absolutely nothing to enhance the credibility of either the PCA or the Labrador Retriever Club of America.

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Barbara   Seattle, WA

1/30/2009 12:51:01 PM

Being a volunteer at a shelter, I firmly believe they should adopt a shelter puppy. There are too many great dogs in this world who end up in shelters through no fault of their own. And, they are the most loving, and appreciative dogs you could have---no matter what their breed, or mixed breed.

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Linny   Sydney, PA

1/28/2009 1:01:24 AM

This story is complete propaganda. There are Labradoodle Guide dogs bred by Guide Dogs Victoria, the Association for the Blind of WA, Guide Dogs America, and Guide Dogs of Texas, as well a many other Assistance Dog Associations - check their websites.

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JEANNETTE   BRISTOL, WI

1/27/2009 2:24:30 PM

YOUR STORY IS
WRONG!!!

I have been soooo mad about what I read here for
Days!!

I posted 5
comments!!

YOUR STORY IS WRONG! GO BACK AND READ THE LETTERS FROM BOTH
CLUBS!!!


http://www.poodleclubofamerica. org/files/PCA_LRC_Comment.pdf

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Jeannette   Bristol, WI

1/27/2009 9:18:06 AM

The Guide Dogs used to serve the Blind are very well cared for. They are Very Happy. Yet One More Reason why it is important to remember. Being a Breeder and to see the trouble someone has caused by putting a label on a mix bred dog... The Poodle is a Good Choice for those with Allergies and if Breeders washed out the importance of their non-shedding coat... those people who do have allergies would not have the chance to own a Guide
dog.
Yes we donated 6 Standard Poodles this year to PilotDogs and Plan to donate again this year. The AKC has done a wonderful watching the breeds in whole. We Love AKC.. We Love Standard Poodles And We Love ManKind.

When the adult dog is ready to retire Pilotdogs will contact the breeder. (NOTE* All puppies donated to Pilotdogs are spayed/neutered!) The Breeder may have someone waiting for a adult dog on a waiting list. If the Breeder does not choose to take the adult retired dog it is offered to the foster Family. The foster family who raised it as a puppy. If they do not choose to take the adult dog it is offered to one OF MANY on a waiting list at the school.The dog then is Moved and lives as a pet.For more information go to
www.pilotdogs.org

When we donate the puppies they go at a very young age. They are not taught to be dogs, They are taught to Guide. Living with a fosterfamily for the first year the foster family teach the puppy the many things the puppy must learn in that first year. The Foster Family Must Socialize the
Puppy.
At 14 mo.s of age the puppy moves back to the school. The foster family may now have the chance to raise another puppy. Usually a program through
4-H
The Puppy lives his/her second year at PilotDogs and is taught everything else he/she needs to learn. Shopping Malls, Downtown busy areas
etc.
dining, banks, public offices
etc.
For more information go to


www.pilotdogs.org
The school and a breeding program. A lot of schools do breed their own dogs. I will not donate to a school who breeds their own dogs. In My opinion I know my personal Standard Poodle Friends are very happy here and I would Not want to put one of my babies in a life of only producing babies. This is why Pilot Dogs accepts puppies mostly through donation. This information being from a phone conversation I had with Jay
Grey.
My Puppies go with AKC paperwork and Spay/Neuter
contracts.
We have 3 Standard Poodles in our home. 1 being a female currently and we will expect a litter from her in the fall of 2009 ....... Not until after the rest of her testing is complete and she is proven to be healthy and
happy.
We wait until she turns 2 yrs old for the Hip test. she turns 2 in march 09 and then we will wait another heat.... Making it about Fall
09.
There is no Money to be made in pet breedings and To be sure we are doing a good service to the Standard Poodle Breed and Man kind we will continue to donate to Pilot
Dogs.
Please Visit www.pilotdogs.org and
www.akc.org
www.myspace/oseasuzi

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Donna   Meshoppen, PA

1/25/2009 12:44:06 PM

Guide dog handlers report that people approach them while the dog is in harness and pet the dog without saying hello. They ask to pet strangers’ dogs & respect their wishes. If they say no, they don’t pet the dog anyway or assume that no one ever pets that dog. This is what happens with guide dogs. It shows that blind people are not respected as independent
adults.

At home, guide dogs get more love, playtime and better care than most pets. They romp with other dogs at the discretion of their
handlers.

As for PETA’s solution of having sighted help... We have proven that we can live productive & independent lives. There are blind chemists, lawyers, engineers, mechanics, teachers, parents etc. But, 70% of working-age blind people are unemployed. Why? Attitudes like those inherent in PETA’s
vitriol.


Some may prefer sighted assistance to a guide dog, but for those of us who are exercising our rights to make such decisions based on our own preferences and expectations, her suggestion is insulting in the extreme. Why would I want someone around for the sole purpose of helping me do something that I can accomplish with greater efficiency & more joy alone? Is a sighted person going to show up when I want to go shopping? How could I go for a quiet walk in the country? This idea also neglects the pragmatic matter of the costs. The work guide dogs do isn't something that a volunteer can replace in one afternoon a
week.

As for health issues … I had a vet in the '80s who spoke of his professor in vet school. He said that if a blind person brings in their guide dog and tells you they think something's wrong and you can't find anything, keep looking. That man knew that not all diagnostics need take place visually. Nachminovitch is right that I can't see if there's blood in his urine, but I submit that I would know something was wrong before that point.

Please help us set the record straight. The CDC just released projections of a three-fold increase in diabetes-related blindness among working-age Americans by 2050. Blindness has one characteristic absent from other minorities. Men don't just wake up as women and white people don't suddenly go black, but most blind people grew up sighted. As such, they developed ideas about what being blind means from society's vast reservoir of misunderstanding and bigotry. If they believe that blindness consigns a person to a life of dependence and uselessness and then lose their vision, they become the image of their own prejudice. Rehab counselors will tell you that overcoming negative ideas about blindness is the hardest obstacle facing newly blinded adults, not learning to use a talking computer, Braille or a guide dog. If society wishes to spare itself the extraordinary burden of supporting the newly blinded people the CDC predicts, changing attitudes must begin
soon.
Please help us

Donna Hill, Head of Media
Relations
Performing Arts Division
NFB
www.padnfb.org

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Donna   Meshoppen, PA

1/25/2009 12:12:50 PM

We have heard much about the Obama’s and the hero pilot Sully Sullenberger. I understand the dog clubs’ desire to comment on the Obama’s pup and applaud them for it. I wonder, however, why they haven’t spoken out about PETA’s vilification of guide dog handlers and people like the Sullenbergers who raise puppies for the
schools.

A 1/10 interview with Daphna Nachminovitch, PETA's vice president for Cruelty Investigations, was on the LA Times blog, "LA Unleashed." She decries the existence of guide
dogs.
http://latimesblogs.latimes. com/unleashed/2009/01/when-we-first-r.html
DaphnaN@peta.org

757-622-7382, extension 1338. Block quote end Donna to Daphna, 1-12-


She says guide dogs are in harness almost 24 hours a day, that they aren't given love and affection, that schools force people to return retired guides, that the schools' should use shelter dogs instead of breeding their own and she infers that blind people living alone are incapable of noticing health issues. Her solution is to have sighted people help blind people. It's important to guide dog handlers and the people who volunteer to raise them that these falsehoods be
countered.

For 37 years, it has been my joy to have the friendship and help of four guide dogs from the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind, Smithtown, NY. I know many other blind people who have had guides from this and other schools. Guide dogs have better and happier lives than most dogs, harnesses are not worn all day, schools don't force people to give up their retiring guides and her solution to a world without guide dogs -- having sighted people help us -- is one of the most insulting, degrading and backward-thinking things I've
heard.


GDF has a retired guide dog program, but using it is up to us, not something forced down our throats. Guide dog schools used shelter dogs years ago. The reason they breed their own is that many shelter dogs could not complete the training. Breeding allows selection for intelligence, good hips and eyes and a temperament for the job. Guide dogs enable their blind handlers to live happy, active and independent lives. They can find specific locations, when taught with patience and praise.


Guide dogs love to work. Many handlers say their dogs practically jump into their harnesses. I don't know anyone who uses their dog around their own house, and even the most active guide dog handlers are only working their dogs a few hours a day. Most working blind people take the harness off at work, when the dog is just going to be resting. When they do not, the reasons generally involve misunderstandings on the part of their employers and co
workers.


As to petting ... all the schools teach us not to allow people to pet our dogs while in harness. There is a difference between work and play, and it is safer for the person and the dog when people respect that
difference.

Help set the record straight

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Jeannette   Bristol, WI

1/23/2009 11:30:46 AM

poodles in
History...

http://www.poodlehistory.org/PMISCOTH.HTM

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poodles

http://www.poodlehistory.org/PMISCFIR.HTM

http://www.poodlehistory.org/PoodlesinWWII.HTM


The REAL REASON WHY PEOPLE DONT WANT THE FIRST FAMILY TO OWN A
POODLE!!!

Poodle
(insult)
From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation,
search
For the dog, see
poodle.
A poodle in politics is an insult used to describe a politician that obediently or passively follows the lead of others.[1] It is considered to be equivalent to
lackey.[2]

Usage of the term is thought to relate to the passive and obedient nature of the type of dog. Occasionally, it is used comparatively, e.g. Big cases will decide if watchdog is just another
poodle.[3]

In Israel, a rookie lawmaker tried to have the term's use banned from the Israeli
parliament.[4]

In recent times, it has been used against Tony Blair with regard to his close relationship with George W. Bush and the actions surrounding Iraq. Pop star George Michael used it in his 2002 song "Shoot the Dog," the video of which showed Blair as a poodle on the White House lawn. However, it has a longer history as being a label to criticize British leaders perceived to be too close to the USA.[1][2][5]

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Nikki   Richmond, VA

1/22/2009 8:05:41 PM

I would like to say that I personally have a labradoodle, and she is the sweetest dog ever. Labradoodles were bred to be hypoallergenic, and they are. Just because the "lab club" and the "poodle club" are rejecting it is so stupid. First generation labradoodles did shed, but later generations were bred not
to.
I am glad they chose the labradoodle. They will be very happy with their choice.

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Jeannette   Bristol, WI

1/22/2009 1:20:13 PM

I called Ms. Peggy... She's not taking phone calls
today...

I can't Believe she said the Poodle is "to Social..." Does she really work with Poodles? I think someone is looking to get LAID OFF...

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Jeannette   Bristol, WI

1/22/2009 10:45:06 AM

This point
is....
Dogs sold with Limited registration may have a flaw or two for one reason or another. Dogs sold with AKC limited registration are pets not breeding
stock.
If you take 2 dogs who each may have flaws and breed them together because you want to sell some puppies.... These puppies may be born with a hand full of flaws... if the puppy is not healthy the puppy is not
happy..
all genetic testing be completed appropriate to their age and variety prior to
breeding.
The following are tests that should be done before you even consider using your poodle for
breeding:

GENETIC TESTING ALL THREE POODLE
VARIETIES:
Progressive Retinal Atrophy and Juvenile
Cataracts
von Willebrands Disease (DNA test for
vWD)
Thyroid
Disorders
Baseline Blood Work
Up

ADDITIONAL TESTING TOY
POODLE:
Luxating
Patellas

ADDITIONAL TESTING MINIATURE
POODLE:
Hip Certification after two years of age, preliminary x-ray may be done at an earlier
age
Entropian
Eye

ADDITIONAL TESTING STANDARD
POODLE:
Hip Certification after two years of age, preliminary x-ray may be done at an earlier age

Entropian
Eye
Sebaceous Adenitis

Addison’s
Disease

Some additional Problems in poodles that we are unable to test for at the present
time:
Bloat and Gastric
Torsion
Seizure
Disorders
Legg-Perthes
Disease
Umbical
Hernia


Adult breeding stock must be tested in order to assure the puppy parent that the puppy will be
healthy.

I have not seen proof of one adult dog who has had a litter of mixed bred puppies... been tested for any of these
tests!
Never have I seen the results or heard of someone testing their adult dog to make a batch of mutts!

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Jeannette   Bristol, WI

1/22/2009 10:32:58 AM

I own Standard Poodles, We Breed Standard Poodles, And We Donate Standard Poodle Puppies to become Guide Dogs for the Blind through PilotDogsInc. So.... To Say that the temperament of a Standard Poodle puppy/dog isn't good enough for the first family..... Is incorrect!

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Lorene   Bedford, MA

1/22/2009 10:18:11 AM

I agree completely with the choice of a purebred dog as opposed to a mixed breed. As the proud owner of a portuguese water dog, I highly recommend this highly intellegent, energetic, and loyal breed for the White House and the Obama family! The Obama daughters will have to give their new puppy lots of exercise though so be prepared.

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ann   nowheresville, LA

1/22/2009 8:22:13 AM

To Melinda from Sydney, IL you took the article completely out of context. The article had nothing to do with Obama's mixed race. They were talking about what was best for the family. There's a reason why pure breed's are favored. As the article mentioned (which it seems you completely missed) mixed breeds are completely unpredictable. They originally bred the Labradoodle to bring the best of both breeds, and
failed.

More importantly the main reason it wouldn't work for the new family, is that the Labradoodle would shed, which Obama's daughter cannot
handle.

You read way too much into it. Read carefully next time, and for one I'm against mixing breeds because it just seems like another money making scam off these poor animals. Let's make yet ANOTHER breed that we dont' understand anything about, to make ANOTHER market for uneducated pet market!

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Melinda   Sydney, IL

1/21/2009 2:52:07 PM

I nearly fell off my chair when I read that the Poodle Club of America "felt we needed to speak out and educate the Obamas ... about the difference between a purebred and a mixed
breed."

As the son of a white American woman and a black African man, somehow I think President Obama would already have a comprehensive and very personal understanding of the issue.


He certainly doesn't need to be "educated" about "mixed breeds" by a bunch of poodle breeders.

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Ariel   St.Louis, MO

1/21/2009 2:51:16 PM

I think these purebred euthusiests need to calm down. Obviously People like these hybrid dogs or they wouldn't be so popular. True, they may not be as easy to read as purebreds (Although purebreds can also have alot of unpredictability. There is no guarantee their daughter will not be allergic to the Labradoodle OR the portugese water dog. Not to mention the Obama's want to adopt and the chances of finding a Labradoodle in a shelter are alot more likely than finder a portuguese water dog.

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Reeta   Ypsilanti, MI

1/21/2009 7:57:21 AM

I agree wholeheartedly with these clubs. Mixed breeds are unpredictable. I hope the Obamas listen up and choose the Portuguese Water Dog. Then at least they will know they are getting a low shedding dog. Doubtful they will find one in a shelter though, although they could get one from a rescue.

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