Garlic

Learn how this natural supplement can cure your dog's ailments.

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The chemical complexity of garlic is good news for the self-reliant herbalist because in addition to allicin, garlic contains a multitude of compounds that are stable and easy to use. Despite its widespread recognition as a healthy food for humans, garlic demands some added respect, caution, and therapeutic consideration if it is to be used effectively in the care of animals. Here are three general rules of proper use:

 Remember that allicin is essential in applications where garlic is to be used as a natural form of antibiotic but may not be necessary if you are using garlic for general health maintenance or other purposes. 

 If you wish to employ garlic as an antibiotic, you need to use raw garlic or raw garlic juice within three hours of chopping or pressing the fresh cloves, or you need a good garlic extract from a reputable source. A properly dried garlic powder may be useful for internal antibiotic applications as well, even though only a residual trace of allicin remains in the powder until it is used. In this case, two compounds called alliin and allinase meet with enzymes to form allicin as they enter the mouth. The allicin then does its work within the bodyfrom the inside out. 

 If you decide to use garlic as a topical antibiotic, bear in mind that raw garlic juice is strong and may cause acute reddening and irritation of skin and mucous membranes if applied in undiluted form. Cut the juice with some olive oil, vegetable glycerin, or water at a starting rate of one part pure garlic juice to two parts inert liquid (oil, water, etc.). If irritation still occurs, further dilute the juice. Such problems can be avoided by infusing fresh cloves of garlic directly into olive oil.

 If you wish to use garlic as a cancer-inhibiting antioxidant agent, immune- system enhancer, blood-thinning agent, cardiovascular tonic, or nutritional supplement, any form of garlic will probably have the desired results. Perhaps the only exceptions are preparations of garlic that have been subjected to heat such as pickled, sauted, boiled, roasted, or otherwise hyperheated cloves that have likely been depleted of their medicinal potential and a considerable percentage of their nutrients.

- More Holistic Tips -

Reprinted from Herbs for Pets © 1999. Permission granted by BowTie Press.

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Janet   Bethlehem, PA

2/12/2012 8:45:31 AM

good article, thank you

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