Air Canada Bans Dogs from Flights

Airline no longer accepts dogs and other pets to fly.

Posted: June 29, 2007, 5 a.m. EDT

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Quebec-based Air Canada airlines will no longer accept dogs and cats for travel in its baggage compartment as of July 15, 2007.

Those with reservations made prior to the rule change will be allowed to bring their pets along, the company says.

Air Canada removed pets from the equation in order, “to effectively handle the high volume of baggage loads and meet the needs of the vast majority of our passengers,” says the airline.

The policy affects all domestic flights, and, pending Canadian Transportation Agency approval, will soon include all international and trans-border flight, Air Canada says.

Pet owners will, however, have the option to send their pets via Air Canada Cargo, which employs a specialized team to handle all types of animals.

Air Canada had already restricted pet travel in September 2006 when it barred them from traveling in cabins.

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Grey   Ft L, FL

6/6/2009 11:38:18 AM

Page 2 from
below

Furthermore an FAA publication indicates as follows: “You will, however, still be exposed to animal dander on every flight even without any animals in the passenger cabin. This is because most animal allergens are carried into the cabin on the clothes of other passengers.


“More than 70 percent of U.S. households have a dog or cat” :American college of asthma allergy and
immunology.

One must conclude that animals in a carrier, stowed below the seat, near the outbound air grill will cause far less animal dander problems than the 70% of the other pet owning
passengers.

Animal smell and
noise

Apart from the fact that the animals are kept on the floor level close to the outward bound air grills and subsequent filtration, sources of smells on an airplane will come from multiple other areas. For example infants, and other passengers. A normal human being passes between one half a liters and 1 L of gas per day. Admittedly a pet also passes gas, but a 20 pound pet (my pet is five pounds) will pass only a 10th of a 200 pound man. Excessive use of perfumes, underuse of deodorants and other smells need to be handled by the air filtration
system.

A pet confined in a normal carrier is extremely unlikely to defecate, unlike human infants or other incontinent
humans.

Air Canada has policies regarding passengers and excessive noise. The same policies would apply to pets. Frankly of the thousands of flights I have taken, I cannot recall being annoyed by any pets making noise. However I can recall excessive noise by people after too much partying, and I’m constantly in fear of being placed beside or near an infant or small child that continues to cry, not withstanding that I use noise cancelling earphones to try and deaden the deafening roar from the
aircraft.

Typically a small pet in his travel bag is quite comfortable and rarely makes any
noise.

Other
airlines

Air Canada and two other North American airlines do not allow pets in the
cabin.

Two wrongs do not necessarily make it right.


However twenty-six other North American airlines do allow pets in the
cabin.

Air Canada Operating revenues 2007 $ 10,164,000,000 (10 Billion) without
Jazz
Jazz $ 2,513,000,000 Operating revenues (2.5
Billion)
West Jet Operating revenues $ 2,151,457,000 (2
billion)

So effectively air Canada monopolises flights originating within Canada.

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Grey   Ft Lauderdale, FL

6/6/2009 11:37:16 AM

Air Canada is
wrong.

An in depth study of “In-flight medical care aboard selected US airlines in 1996 and 1997” concluded that of 1132 medical incidents. Of these 1132 only 27 (2.3%) were due to some form of allergic reaction. In fact a total of only 145 were diverted 7.8% (considered serious enough for the diversion) The bulk of these were for Cardiac reasons. There was no mention of whether any of the allergic reactions was severe enough for the flights to be diverted, nor was there mention of which type of allergic reaction. There is a table showing one instance of use of a topical antihistamine and one instance of a
Vasodilator.

Thus the cause of the allergic reaction on the small number of in-flight cases was not mentioned. However checking statistics on the general public outside of airlines, causes of severe allergic reactions enough to cause death in the United States are as
follows:

Penicillin 400 deaths per
year
Food allergy 150 deaths per
year
Insect sting 40 deaths per
year
Latex allergy 3 deaths per
year

An extensive search could not reveal in the general population any allergic reaction to pets that caused
death.

Similar studies in Great Britain indicate similar low percentage of any allergic reactions on
flights.

One must conclude that any serious allergic reaction on a flight is more than extremely unlikely to be caused by a pet, and far more likely to be caused by touching a tray, an armrest, or other item that has been touched by someone else; for example someone that has eaten or touched peanuts or similar allergenic
substance.

Ventilation system in an
airplane

Studies have been made of the possibility of a virus spreading in an airplane. These documents show that airflow in an airplane comes from multiple overhead supply outlets along the length of the aircraft and ventilates directly downwards through multiple floor grilles in the floor. Half of the cabin air is re-circulated passing through High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters and a half of the air is fresh.


Even according to Air Canada’s website:


“There is a total air change (filtered recirculated plus outside air) every 2 - 3 minutes or 20 to 30 exchanges per hour. This is far more than for any home or office building and easily maintains cabin contaminants to low
levels.”

A pet enclosed in an approved pet carrier placed below a seat (of necessity close to the outward bound air grilles in the floor) is extremely unlikely to convey pet dander against the airflow should dander even escape their pet carrier. The HEPA filters are designed to even remove bacteria (they are used in pharmaceutical production). Bacteria are many times more microscopic than pet dander.

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DAVID DUNSMUIR   HAMILTON ONTARIO CANADA, ON

5/26/2009 6:55:25 AM

DOGS SHOULD BE ALLOWED IN CABIN!

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Christy   Covina, CA

6/29/2007 8:55:08 PM

Love me, love my dog! No more Air Canada!!!!!!

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