Comments on Is Elevated Liver Count in Dog Bad News?

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Gina   Bonita Springs, Florida

1/13/2014 5:17:21 PM

I have a 12 year old doxie that went in for routine exams and found very high live count. She did have an ultra sound that showed a mildly rounded enlarged liver but the Dr said everything else was very normal...no tumors or gall bladder problem which can cause a liver count to be elevated. So he is putting her on meds to bring the count down and will re check. A liver with the right meds can repair itself. It's not a death sentence. It's worth looking into and getting the right meds.

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Elaine   Salt Lake City, Utah

10/21/2013 8:50:52 AM

My 13 year old shih Tzu is having ultrasound today for elevated liver enzymes of 1,740...........very anxious for results of test.

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Lisa   Salem, Illinois

7/2/2013 8:05:25 AM

My Lhaso Apso is over 10 years old, he is blind and nearly deaf and I had to board him these last few days due to my having some surgery. They suggested doing blood work on him as he seemed tired a lot and had loose stools. His liver levels were very high, alt is 437 and his other liver level is 659. They simply suggested putting him on the Science diet dog food LP. They did not mention the drug I have read about. I am afraid that too much damage has been done. He just has had no quality of life since going blind, it's so sad.

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Maria   Irving, Texas

6/2/2013 2:46:30 PM

My beagle diagonise with high liver enzimes she is at the vet on IV for 3 time last week. She still don't eat but tolerate cold water only, its ok for her to drink so much?

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billie   virginia b, Virginia

5/7/2013 3:42:11 AM

my dog is 11years old and her blood levels ,enzymes was 100 and in 6 months 250 and now they want to do a liver check . which they want to do blood work and feed her and then check her blood again ..the vet wants to charge me 150.00 for the test ... the reason is that she is due to be put to sleep to have her teeth clean they want to make sure that she is up to be put her threw this teeth cleaning

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Ashlee   Berwyn, Illinois

12/28/2012 9:10:26 AM

My grand mothers dog rocky has high liver count as well nd the vet gave rocky meds she went bAck today nd the liver isn't better their running more tests

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Martha   Reidsville, North Carolina

10/10/2012 6:47:58 PM

my min.Schnauzer was diagnosis with high liver enzymes level; he's taking antib. & Denosyl, his energy level is great he eats a little less; sometimes
he
tries to throwup but not often; further testing will be done after 2 more
weeks
but I don't know if I can put him through any more testing; just don't
know.
the next blood test will be the 3rd one. I am hope the level will go down; but

I read some interesting thing on this site; and I will be giving him bottle water from this point on. I am thankful for a great
Vet.
M. W.

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Cheryl   Lady lake, Florida

10/10/2012 5:40:44 AM

My 11 yr old daschund was just diagnosed with pancreatitis and high liver enzymes, vet wants her to go have other testing done which is very costly, I don't mind spending the money if it is something that can be cured but I am so afraid it is cancer and I don't want to put her through chemotherapy, I just lost my son a year ago with the same symptoms, he lived only 7 weeks after his diagnosis, I don't know what to do, any advise?

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Mark   London, AL

4/21/2012 12:58:29 PM

Hi there - my 14yr old cocker spaniel recently had counts of almost 5000! He was jaundiced and very ill and it all happened very suddenly. The vets almost wrote him off but we agreed to a liver biopsy as he was (thankfully) in superb condition otherwise - no heart issues etc. They and we opted for the invasive proper op as the smaller less invasive incision would not have allowed them to get a good enough look at the liver or to get a biopsy worth testing for accurate feedback. We are so pleased we did. It turned out he had a liver infection and is now on the mend. Had we listened to initial prognosis he wouldnt be here today as it was 'cancer or liver failure' - it wasnt - and I;m so pleased we spent the money to hang on in there and get it checked properly.

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Jackie   Manchester, NH

1/8/2012 3:14:18 PM

Two years ago, a routine blood test revealed elevated liver enzymes for my 6 year old Coton De Tulear. The Dr checked the enzymes again the following month and it increased to nearly 200. At that point, I was referred to a specialist and within two months my dog's liver enzymes had climbed to nearly 800. The only change in his behavior was that he was sleeping more. Thankfully, I had pet insurance so we did an ultrasound, and when that provided no definitive answers we had a biopsy. The biopsy showed my dog had copper storage syndrome and a congenital liver disease. The Dr started my dog on Marin, Sam-E, fish oil, and vegan dog food. I also had my water tested (we have well water) and learned the copper was 1/10 above safe limits for humans so needless to say my dog and my family have been drinking bottled water ever since. After three months of this regimen, my dog's liver enzymes decreased to 155 and have remained between 151-155 for the past two years. What a blessing! The dr said because we caught it early and are treating it, he should live a long and healthy life. I realize every story is different but I am sharing mine because there is a small chance it may help others.

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Eileen   Phoenix, AZ

11/22/2011 10:28:28 AM

My 14.5 year old Border Collie X in very good health and spirits (except for periodic IBD occurances) just started vomiting brownish bile and was generally lethargic... wouldn't eat or get up. Blood test shows liver level of 3000. Her vet suggests an ultrasound or biopsy or, as a less invasive option, antibiotics for a week just in case the elevation is due to a virus of some sort. Not sure what to do... don't want her to be suffering for a week if there is a tumor or some other issue. If it is a tumor, it is unlikely we will operate because of her advanced age. What is liklihood that the antibiotics will "cure" what is wrong with her?

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Vania   Miami, FL

11/5/2011 8:26:40 AM

Hi my dog Ethel is a shitzu and she is 11 years old. A few months ago her liver enzymes were elevated in the 900 range and she was put on some meds. Last week we redid her blood work and they increased to 2700. She is acting normal with no symptoms. The only thing I have noticed is she is drinking an excessive amount of water other than that nothing else. My vet wants to do an nultrasound which is very costly. I am not sure what to do, any suggestions?

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Barbara   Brooklyn, NY

10/29/2011 3:02:02 PM

I would like to agree with Dr. Geller. My dog has recently gone through a routine blood test and it was discovered that his lever ensymes were elevated. 2 weeks later he was retested and the same liver ensymes went down and were half as elevated. The vet naturally wants to do an ultrasound. The dog is a 2 1/2 year old Havanese and is taking Denosyl and Milk Thisle for 3 weeks. I would like to retest again for a 3rd time in a few weeks before doing an ultrasound. He was originally prescribed Clavamox, Bayril, Densoyl and milk thistle after the first blood test.

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Karen   Rochester, NY

9/27/2011 9:14:36 AM

Hi, I'm interested in this discussion, as we're going through something similar with our dog, Maggie. She's about 8 years old (a schnoodle we adopted in 2004) and had a midyear "senior dog" checkup with the vet last winter. At that time her liver enzymes were elevated. We waited a while and had her re-tested--the levels had doubled. At that point we had her tested for Cushings--negative--and had an ultrasound done--normal. The vet recommended putting her on a prescription liver diet food and giving her medication once a day. After 10 weeks we just had her retested and the levels had doubled again, to around 2100.

She shows no symptoms of illness, is active, eating and drinking normally. We discussed the latest situation with the vet and told her that we really didn't want to subject Maggie to a biopsy when she is showing no symptoms, and she agreed (she had discussed Maggie's case with a vet specializing in internal medicine and he said the next step would be a biopsy.) So we are going to watch her and have her checked again in about 6 months. Hopefully, she will remain healthy during this time. It is worrisome but I feel we've made the right decision for now.

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Kerri   Oregon, OH

9/21/2011 9:35:49 PM

Dear MG, Thurmont, MD: I too have a border collie/golden mix and today went through the same process as you stated here. They have ruled out Cushing disease. My dog is 9 yrs old and has a large lump just above her back leg/knee. They did not go through with the procedure today due to her liver panel results. What they found is she has an issue with her gall bladder. Did your vet check your dogs gall bladder? Just curious. My vet said this could be what is causing her to pant (more) because my dog is active (is slowing down some due to age), but does not like to be hot like your dog. Anyway....they checked for gall stones and it came back negative. So, her vet compared it to a human with gall bladder issues, it would be uncomfortable therefore cause discomfort and most likely panting. She has put her on Ursodiol capsules (I had to get them at a pharmacy). She wants her to take the meds for a few weeks before removing the lump (Oct 12th). We are going to monitor things.

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John   Alexandria, VA

9/20/2011 2:56:16 PM

Sheila, how is your ShiTzu? What was the out come?

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MG   Thurmont, MD

4/10/2011 4:20:34 PM

I have been doing a lot of research trying to figure out what is going on with my dog. She is a 13 y/o border collie/golden retriever mix. Last May, prior to having a benign lump removed from her leg, her blood work showed elevated ALT enzymes in the liver. She had no symptoms. Testing for Cushings was done. All negative. A year later, I have noticed an increase in her panting - almost like she has run a great distance, yet only has walked up the stairs. When she is quiet, the panting is sometimes there, but quiet. She doesn't like to be hot at all (which has been the case since she was a puppy) and will also pant (I keep my house about 62). At her annual checkup last week, bloodwork again revealed extremely high ALT (2,193!). Chest xrays, EKG, and blood pressure were checked. All normal. The vet wants to do another test for Cushings. Reading the symptoms, I'm fairly convinced she does not have Cushings. She eats and drinks normal, her activity is normal (a little slower being 13). There are no signs of any issues other than the panting. I have been told and have read that excessive panting is "normal" for older dogs. I'm at a loss and I think my vet is, too. Any suggestions?

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Sheila   Plymouth, MA

12/14/2010 3:59:49 PM

Thank you for this article..our ShiTzu, 6 year old had been gaining weight at an amazing rate, also drinking a good leal of water. At a regular visit blood tests were taken and the liver enzymes were elevated. The vet suspected Cushings but the ATCH test was not positive. We now go for more blood tests and ultra sound.Depending on results we will make some other decisions. Oour dog is behaving normally...thank goodness.

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Diana   Seattle, WA

12/8/2010 8:20:33 PM

I have a 3 year old Boston Terrier, Lolita, who has had diarrheas very easily and until any problem with the food. We fed her with rice and meats and since she had repetitivediarrhea we made a consultation. Vets never gave us many good advices, finally I got to the conclusion that could be the starch allergy, I canceled the rice and replace by polenta (does not have any starch). The dog was quite normal for some time. But we were recommended to put her in a dry dog food because she was not getting all the vitamins they needed. Well, here was my dog drama. There is no good enough dry food that goes well with her and after 4-5 months of constant diarrhea and finally Bowel irritable desease, they found a little bit elevated the liver enzimes. The dog is active, eats very well, she did not change any behavior, she seems very lucky, but... now we were recommended many tests that cost a lot. Another blood test and eventually a liver test. I am not very sure that my dog needs all these test, and the article warn me about that. Should I consult another doctor? Is their recommendation of making more test the correct?

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josie   san francisco, CA

9/10/2010 2:14:45 PM

I am not too sure what it means.

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