Let's Talk Dogs

By | posted:October 22, 2010 2:43 p.m.

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The main reason I am starting this column is not just to tell you about me and my dogs, and my dog world, but also to get to know you and your dogs. One of my many joys about owning a dog is getting to meet new dogs and dog lovers. So please, I strongly encourage you to join in the conversation, just as if we were meeting on a walking trail or at the local dog park.

While I am the editor of DogChannel.com and DOG FANCY magazine, I am just another dog lover to those I meet, and the first thing all dog people want to know is: What kind of dogs do you have?

I have two permanent dogs, Gordon, 4, and Munchkin, 12, both Cairn Terriers. When people ask what they are I just say "Toto dogs,'' and they know right away. Thank goodness for Toto and "The Wizard of Oz."

Let's Talk Dogs

Munchkin

Munchkin, whose color has changed from light red as a puppy to nearly black, is a retired show champion: Ch. Redcoat's Over the Rainbow. My Cairns, past and present, have helped me learn a great deal about proper breeding, grooming, handling and showing dogs. I volunteer as vice president with the Cairn Terrier Club of Southern California, helping put on puppy and dog shows, staffing "meet the breed" and pet fair booths.

 

For 14 years I have also been active in all facets of terrier rescue, for both purebred Cairns and mixed breeds. Seven years ago I also started volunteering with Greyhound rescue and volunteer at a local shelter each week. I work as a "Spoiler,'' helping to socialize and teach basic obedience to these amazingly sweet dogs, so they can be placed in forever homes. My current rescue Greyhounds that I work with each week are A-List, Haven and Cuidado.

Let's Talk Dogs

Gordon


Two years ago a dog-walking friend pointed out that my younger terrier, Gordon, was especially mellow and loving. (He thinks every animal or person he meets is his friend, even cats!) So more than a year ago I trained him and gained certification with Therapy Dogs International. Each week I take him to visit Children's Hospital of Orange County, where he brings unconditional love, impish joy and much comfort to ailing children. Then twice a week he visits adult patients at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, Calif.

Working with rescue dogs and doing therapy dog work is the most life-affirming experience I have ever had. No matter how concerned I might be about the state of the world or some everyday trouble, when I spend time at the shelter or visit hospital patients with Gordon I come away feeling so incredibly positive and upbeat.

I would love to hear why your dogs are special to you, so please leave comments and join in this conversation about our best friends in the animal world.

- Read more of Editor Off Leash -


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Diane Daniels Manning   Houston, TX

2/8/2014 8:33:01 AM

My Standard poodles have been special to me over the years because they help out as loving "therapists" at the New School in the Heights in Houston, a therapeutic school I co-founded for bright children with social and emotional issues. They taught me that addressing children's inner world of feelings is as important to successful learning as traditional "academics." That's why I co-founded The New School in the Heights and why I am giving 100% of the profits for my novel, Almost Perfect, to my school and other charities serving dogs and animals. I'm especially psyched about the book today because it tells about an old woman and a boy going to Westminster. I can hardly wait to find out if Agility will be
televised!
Diane Daniels Manning

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Karen - 251689   Zephyrhills, FL

9/9/2013 7:56:11 AM

My dogs are special to me because I "rescued" them, when asked. Their eyes tell me how much they love being with me. As a former Doberman Pinscher handler/breeder with champion dogs, I now regret such an activity. Clipping ears and grinding nails for show was wrong. Euthanizing for defective genes was wrong. Selling pups and adults who were non-conformation without sterilization was wrong. Animal sponsors should insist sterilization until millions of dogs are no longer euthanized because of the unwanted numbers. My dogs (and rescue goats) are all sterile. Too many people are not responsible owners. Join organizations such as Best Friends (better yet, take a vacation there), PETA, ASPC, and local rescues. Tell your church leaders the congregation needs to offer free animal food banks and spay clinics.

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J.C.   Staten Island, New York

8/25/2013 7:41:11 AM

Ernie,
My name is J.C. Carr. I am deeply concerned with the inhumane treatment of animals, especially, the dogs who suffer horribly for years in puppy mills and the overpopulation and euthanasia of millions of animals in shelters every year. I have written a very important, yet delicate children's book, titled S.J. GOES HOME. It is based on the true story of my own rescued collie, S.J., who is the main character and narrator, who tells his heartfelt story from the perspective of a puppy mill
dog.
It was written to educate children, parents, teachers and all people to the plight of the puppy mill dogs and to encourage pet
adoption.
I ask and urge you to check it out. it is available on Amazon.com where it has received outstanding reviews. It is a must read for dog lovers and all concerned with stopping puppy mills and adopt your new best friend from a shelter.

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Eileen - 249708   Port Perry, ON

7/18/2013 4:50:02 AM

Since I got my dog I have met all kinds of amazing dog people and my dog has taught me so much about navigating life. Great article.

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