Dog in Wheelchair Climbs Northeast’s Highest Peak

Wheelchair-bound mutt Lucy climbed Mount Washington Auto Road in New Hampshire.

Posted: September 1, 2010, 2 a.m. EDT

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Handicapped dog LucyLucy may be in a wheelchair, but that didn’t stop the 4-year-old mutt from summiting the Northeast’s highest peak on Aug. 18.

Lucy and owner Courtney Dunning of Peterborough, N.H., climbed the 7.6-mile Mount Washington Auto Road in New Hampshire in six hours and two minutes. The active pair trained for the climb for weeks and did a test trek up the road’s first two miles in mid-July.

“I think many people underestimate handicapped pets and do not realize just how much they can do given proper care and training,” Dunning says.

Lucy was rescued from the streets of Puerto Rico after being hit and paralyzed by a car. But the pooch, who loves to bark at squirrels and chipmunks (“she takes it very seriously,” Dunning says), still gets exercise every day.

“Each day is different,” Dunning says. “Some days are short walks around town, others are long walks on bike paths, hikes or jogs.”

Mark C. Robinson, president of HandicappedPets.com and inventor of the Walkin’ Wheels dog wheelchair that Lucy uses, was equally proud of the pair’s accomplishment.

“Lucy demonstrates how handicapped pets can continue to lead happy, healthy, active lives,” he says. The specialized wheelchair allows dogs to do “more than simply survive injuries that were once considered life ending,” he says. “With appropriate veterinary care and physical training, dogs in wheelchairs can thrive and even reach levels of athletic achievement.”

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Anna   Maple Grove, MN

9/4/2010 7:18:28 PM

How inspiring! Lucy is such a cutie!

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John   San Jose, CA

9/3/2010 9:42:30 PM

Many medical procedures used on humans are now being used on dogs and catsa and other pets. And just like with humans these procedues and equipment can add years of productive life to an otherwise doomed
animal.

And blessed are the humans who adopt and take care od handicapped animals.

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Dayna   Alloway, NJ

9/3/2010 8:03:44 AM

I have a dog named Lucy. But shes not in a wheelchair. I love hereing storys about dogs in wheelchairs. thhis one made me think of how lucky that dog is, to be save after comin face to face with death. Dog that you rescue, you shouldn't feel sorry for them, just be haappy that they get a second chance:)

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Terry   Houston, TX

9/3/2010 5:09:10 AM

Very heart warming story! Thanks!

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